FY14 Call Stats
Fire EMS Total
Jul-13 74 137 211
Aug-13 58 144 202
Sep-13 79 135 214
Oct-13 88 136 224
Nov-13 78 112 190
Dec-13 92 115 207
Jan-14 57 92 149
Feb-14 75 63 138
Mar-14 80 121 201
Apr-14 77 151 228
May-14 95 151 246
Jun-14 65 130 195
Total 918 1487 2405

FY14 Apparatus Call Stats
Engine 22 197
Engine 23 216
Engine 24 130
Tanker 2 116
Squad 2 367
AMB 27 699
AMB 28 953

FY14 Incidents
Fires 155
Gas Leaks 26
Assist EMS 96
MVA's 106
Extrications 14

Past Call Stats
FY Fire EMS Total
2014 918 1487 2405
2013 975 1775 2475
2012 990 1545 2645
2011 912 1489 2401
2010 918 1540 2458
2009 947 1653 2600
2008 1006 1639 2645
2007 1010 1465 2475

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Maryland Smoke Alarm Information
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By HVFD PIO
January 3, 2018

Maryland is the most recent state to require the more modern alarms which are tamper-resistant and last for 10 years without the battery needing to be replaced. It’s part of a nationwide trend to transition from old smoke detectors powered by 9-volt batteries to new smoke alarms that have a 10-year life span.

The law, aimed at reducing home fire deaths, went into effect on July 1, 2013. It requires replacement of any battery-only operated smoke alarm that is more than 10 years old with a unit powered by a 10-year sealed-in battery having a “Hush” button feature. The effective date for compliance with this requirement was January 1, 2018.

Why is a sealed-in battery important? Nationally, two-thirds of all home fire deaths occur in homes with either no smoke alarm or no working smoke alarm, mainly due to missing or disconnected batteries. By sealing the battery inside the alarm, the unit becomes tamper resistant and removes the burden from consumers to remember to change batteries, which in turn, will save lives. These sealed-in, long-life battery smoke alarms provide continuous protection for a decade, and national fire experts with the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and National Association of State Fire Marshals (NASFM) recommend their use.

The new Maryland Smoke Alarm Law, Public Safety Article Sections 9-101 through 9-109 requires the replacement of smoke alarms when they are ten years old; (ten years from the date of manufacture). The date of manufacture, while sometimes hard to locate, should be printed on the back of the smoke alarm. If no manufacture date can be located, it is clearly time to replace the smoke alarm. The new law heavily emphasizes the use of sealed-battery smoke alarms with a long life battery and a silence/hush button feature. However, it is critical to understand these devices are appropriate only where battery-only operated smoke alarms presently exist or in locations where no smoke alarms are present. (It is never acceptable to remove required wired in smoke alarms and replace them with any type of battery-only operated device). A 110 volt electrically powered smoke alarm may only be replaced with a new 110 volt unit with a battery backup.

Smoke alarms need to be placed on every level of the home and outside the sleeping areas, such as, the hallway accessing the bedrooms. It is also recommended to place them inside each bedroom to allow sound sleepers to be alerted if smoke begins to enter the room. Please remember to keep bedroom doors closed when sleeping to help ensure smoke, toxic gases and flames can't easily enter the bedroom allowing you more time to escape.

State Fire Marshal Brian S. Geraci emphasizes the value of smoke alarms, “The importance of ensuring the proper maintenance and use of smoke alarms is paramount. The materials used in products we keep in our homes tend to burn much more readily, thus giving us a very limited window of time to escape the effects of fire. These early warning devices can be the difference between life or death in an incident of an uncontrolled fire inside our homes”.

More information in reference to the smoke detector change can be found in the attachment provided and/or at www.mdlifesafety.org. Please remember, working smoking alarms save lives and are imperative to your safety.

Attachments:
Attachment Smoke Alarm Revisions.pdf  (150k)
 
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